4 Illustrations of What Anxiety Really Feels Like

For people living with chronic anxiety, it can be difficult to describe to others what it actually feels like. Many people I’ve spoken with think anxiety is a state of worrying or being stressed out about something, like a school exam, relationship problem, or a major life change like switching careers or moving to a new city. They think it’s a feeling of worry with a direct root cause — and if you fix the root cause, you won’t feel anxious anymore. This isn’t what chronic anxiety feels like to me. I wish it was that simple and neat. Chronic anx

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Mental Health Resources

When should you get help? The following symptoms might be signs of an underlying mental health condition: thoughts of hurting yourself or others frequent or persistent feelings of sadness, anger, fear, worry, or anxiety frequent emotional outbursts or mood swings confusion or unexplained memory loss delusions or hallucinations intense fear or anxiety about weight gain dramatic changes in eating or sleeping habits unexplained changes in school 'Read More'

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The Effects of Stress on Your Body

You’re sitting in traffic, late for an important meeting, watching the minutes tick away. Your hypothalamus, a tiny control tower in your brain, decides to send out the order: Send in the stress hormones! These stress hormones are the same ones that trigger your body’s “fight or flight” response. Your heart races, your breath quickens, and your muscles ready for action. This response was designed to protect your body in an emergency 'Read More'

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The Big Picture of Wellness – Stress Management, Good Sleep and Nutrition Go Hand in Hand

Weight management and healthy eating are issues that wellness professionals face every day with their clients. However, nutritionists, wellness coaches and personal trainers. 'press 'Read now'

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Depression

Sadness touches our lives at different times, but usually comes and goes. Depression, in contrast, often has enormous depth and staying power. It is more than a passing bout of "the blues." Press 'Read More'

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4 Simple Ways to Reduce Stress

4 Simple Ways to Reduce Stress It’s important to keep in mind that stress is not necessarily a bad thing. Positive stress helps you to focus on work and accomplish tasks. High stress levels may also 'Read More'

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10 Self-Care Strategies That Help Me Manage My Depression

Developing these 10 acts of self-care has been a journey, one that continues today. The challenging (and fun) aspect of loving ourselves is that it’s an individual process. I had to explore what works best for me, and I continue to learn — in therapy, from friends, and in books and online — about new ways that I can take good care of myself. Each of these tools remind me that I can cope with mental illness and that I always have a choice of how to handle my symptoms. Every time I choose self-care I am reconnected with two important truths: that I deserve to love myself and that I, indeed, am worth it.

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Explains 'Stress'

Stress in 60 Seconds

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10 Reasons Why Training Outdoors is Good For You

10 Reasons Why Training Outdoors is Good For You 1a. It lowers blood pressure and reduces stress Studies have shown that physical activity outdoors lowers a person's blood pressure and heart rate. As a result, exercise outdoors feels less strenuous than similar exercise indoors, which, in turn, pushes you closer to your maximum performance. Train outdoors, push yourself to the limit and keep breaking your personal record! 1b Enhanced Self-esteem Research shows that as little as five minutes of outdoor exercise can improve self-esteem (Barton and Pretty, 2010). Any outdoor location will do, but being near greenery or water enhances this effect. Interestingly, low- to moderate-intensity physical activity shows greater improvements in self-esteem than high-intensity outdoor exercise. Activities shown to improve self-esteem include walking, cycling, horseback riding, fishing and gardening. A regular dose of outdoor activity can help boost the already powerful esteem-enhancing effect of exercise. Outdoor exercise has been proven to reduce stress. 2. Helps with insomnia When you exercise outdoors, you get fresh air which helps to alleviate insomnia. Regular exercise and fresh air will help you to fall asleep and improve the quality of your sleep! Regular exercise and fresh air will also improve the quality of your sleep.

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The importance of sleep

Thom explains how through his improved rest and REM cycles he has increased his capacity for creativity and problem solving. Zane Lowe remarks upon how we fail.. Press'Read More'

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Types of mental health problems

Types of mental health problems If you’ve been diagnosed with a mental health problem you might be looking for information on your diagnosis, treatment options and where to go for support. Our information pages will help you learn more. Anger Explains what anger is, and how to deal with it in a constructive and healthy way. Anxiety and panic attacks Explains anxiety and panic attacks, including possible causes and how you can access treatment and support. Includes tips for helping yourself, and guidance for friends and family. Bipolar disorder Explains what bipolar disorder is, what kinds of treatment are available, and how you can help yourself cope. Also provides guidance on what friends and family can do to help. Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) Explains body dysmorphic disorder, including possible causes and how you can access treatment and support. Includes tips for helping yourself, and guidance for friends and family. Borderline personality disorder (BPD) Explains what BPD is and what it’s like to live with this diagnosis. Also provides information about self-care, treatment and recovery, and gives guidance on how friends and family can help. Depression Explains depression, including possible causes and how you can access treatment and support. Includes tips for helping yourself, and guidance for friends and family. Dissociation and dissociative disorders Explains dissociative disorders, including possible causes and how you can access treatment and support. Includes tips for helping yourself, and guidance for friends and family. Drugs - recreational drugs & alcohol Explains the mental health effects of recreational drugs and alcohol, and what might happen if you use recreational drugs and also have a mental health problem. Includes suggestions for where you might find support. Eating problems Explains eating problems, including

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Why ‘Fine’ Isn’t a Feeling, and Why You Should Care

Fine.” The word sounds innocent enough. And most of us hear it — and use it — multiple times every day. But there’s more packed into this four-letter word than you might think. To talk about the troublesome nature of 'Read More'

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Is There a Connection Between Anxiety and Anger?

Working with a therapist trained in CBT may help you identify what triggers your anxiety or anger. You can also learn to notice thoughts that are distorting your view of reality. Once you identify them, you can learn to reframe your thoughts in a way that helps you manage anger and anxiety. This process isn’t a quick fix, but research shows that CBT is very effective for treating chronic anxiety and anger issues.

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The physical benefits of exercise

The physical benefits of exercise — improving physical condition and fighting disease — have long been established, and physicians always encourage staying physically active. Exercise is also considered 'Read More'

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5 Ways to Understand Your Anxiety

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A Day in the Life of Someone with Social Anxiety

Never suffer with mental illness in silence. The situation might feel hopeless, but there is always something that can be done. 'Read More'

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10 stress busters If you're stressed, whether by your job or something more personal, the first step to feeling better is to identify the cause. The most unhelpful thing you can do is turn to something unhealthy to help you cope, such as smoking or drinking. "In life, there's always a solution to a problem," says Professor Cary Cooper, an occupational health expert at the University of Lancaster. "Not taking control of the situation and doing nothing will only make your problems worse." He says the keys to good stress management are building emotional strength, being in control of your situation, having a good social network, and adopting a positive outlook. Check out our selection of stress-busting apps in the NHS Apps Library. What you can do to address stress These are Professor Cooper's top 10 stress-busting suggestions: Be active Exercise won't make your stress disappear, but it will reduce some of the emotional intensity that you're feeling, clearing your thoughts and letting you deal with your problems more calmly. For more advice, read how being active helps mental wellbeing. Get started with exercise Take control There's a solution to any problem. "If you remain passive, thinking, 'I can't do anything about my problem', your stress will get worse," says Professor Cooper. "That feeling of loss of control is one of the main causes of stress and lack of wellbeing." The act of taking control is in itself empowering, and it's a crucial part of finding a solution that satisfies you and not someone else. Get tips on how to manage your time Connect with people A good support network of colleagues, friends and family can ease your work troubles and help you see things in a different way. "If you don't connect with people, you won't have support to turn to when you need help," says Professor Cooper. The activities we do with friends help us relax. We often have a good laugh with them, which is an excellent stress reliever. "Talking things through with a friend will also help you find solutions to your problems," says Professor Cooper. Read about some other ways relationships help our wellbeing. Have some 'me time' Here in the UK, we work the longest hours in Europe, meaning we often don't spend enough time doing things we really enjoy. "We all need to take some time for socialising, relaxation or exercise," says Professor Cooper. He recommends setting aside a couple of nights a week for some quality "me time" away from work. "By earmarking those 2 days, it means you won't be tempted to work overtime," he says. Challenge yourself Setting yourself goals and challenges, whether at work or outside, such as learning a new language or a new sport, helps build confidence. This will help you deal with stress. "By continuing to learn, you become more emotionally resilient as a person," says Professor Cooper. "It arms you with knowledge and makes you want to do things rather than be passive, such as watching TV all the time." Avoid unhealthy habits Don't rely on alcohol, smoking and caffeine as your ways of coping. "Men more than women are likely to do this. We call this avoidance behaviour," says Professor Cooper. "Women are better at seeking support from their social circle." In the long term, these crutches won't solve your problems. They'll just create new ones. "It's like putting your head in the sand," says Professor Cooper. "It might provide temporary relief, but it won't make the problems disappear. You need to tackle the cause of your stress." Help other people Professor Cooper says evidence shows that people who help others, through activities such as volunteering or community work, become more resilient. "Helping people who are often in situations worse than yours will help you put your problems into perspective," says Professor Cooper. "The more you give, the more resilient and happy you feel." If you don't have time to volunteer, try to do someone a favour every day. It can be something as small as helping someone cross the road or going on a coffee run for colleagues. Find out more about giving for mental wellbeing Work smarter, not harder Working smarter means prioritising your work, concentrating on the tasks that'll make a real difference. "Leave the least important tasks to last," says Cooper. "Accept that your in-tray will always be full. Don't expect it to be empty at the end of the day." Get tips on how to manage your time better Try to be positive Look for the positives in life, and things for which you're grateful. "People don't always appreciate what they have," says Professor Cooper. "Try to be glass half full instead of glass half empty," he says. Try writing down 3 things that went well, or for which you're grateful, at the end of every day. Listen to an audio guide on beating unhelpful thinking.

10 stress busters f you're stressed, whether by your job or something more personal, the first step to feeling better is to identify the cause. The most unhelpful thing you can do is turn to something unhealthy to help you cope, such as smoking or drinking. "In life, there's always a solution to a problem. "Not taking control of the situation and doing nothing will only make your problems worse."

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